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Thread: wicked winter!

  1. #1

    wicked winter!

    Im hoping this weekends frigid cold is the last gasp of this fricken winter. it seems like its been 20 degrees out for months. heres wishing for some balmy 30 degree weather mid next week. for those going to florida on this winter break enjoy! think of me watching my kid play hockey on outdoor rinks this weekend in the teens and windy

  2. #2
    Jets Moderator ret2ski's Avatar
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    By Florida standards it's been consistently below average here also. But whenever I feel myself starting to whine I just put on the Weather Channel & get things into perspective.

    Since I am originally from the Northeast I can relate for how tough it is for you guys right now.

  3. #3
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    I don't know how you guys do it, I could never live back there again.

  4. #4
    OK last week we had -31 wind chills in NJ for 2 days and it looks like my prediction was off by another week of artic air. the UN scientists are really going to have to fudge the numbers for the northern hemisphere this year

  5. #5
    That's when the revert to "Climate change", "climate disruption", "dying seas" and what whatever else they can dream up..

    BTW, I'm not much of a beer drinker anymore, but the subject line of this thread makes me remember this (fondly)..


  6. #6
    Jets Moderator ret2ski's Avatar
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    Lots of places are not going to break records over the next 2 days, they are going to absolutely shatter them!

    How long before we see glaciers take over the finger lakes?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ret2ski View Post
    Lots of places are not going to break records over the next 2 days, they are going to absolutely shatter them!

    How long before we see glaciers take over the finger lakes?
    Don't forget .. 2014 was the "hottest EVER!!!" LOL

    You know, like this wicked bad wintah (actually three weeks - it was mild and tame before the SB) might be the "snowiest ever"? LMAO

    Perspective please people .. get a grip!

    And bot .. 'GO READ A BOOK'.

    Remembering the Great Snow of 1717 in New England

    Had enough snow yet? Given the staggering Great Snow of 1717, it’s somewhat surprising that this question isn’t the official New England motto. That year, historians report that New England had probably the roughest winter it ever recorded.



    So much snow fell that year, capped off by a series of storms that started in late February, that the Puritans in Boston held no church services for two successive weeks, reportedCotton Mather. The events were so unusual that he and other contemporary diarists made note of how exceptionally harsh it was throughout New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Connecticut.

    Though the dates varied, the storms are most commonly cited as having occurred between February 27 and March 9, though others include storms of February 18 to the 24th as being part of the Great Snow of 1717.

    Regardless of dates, for generations after it became common in New England to refer to events as having occurred either before or after the great snow. Writers including Henry David Thoreau made reference to its historical significance in their work.


    Cotton Mather


    Throughout the region snow totals from the back-to-back storms were recorded of four, five and six feet, with drifts as high as 25 feet. Entire houses were covered over, identifiable only by a thin curl of smoke coming out of a hole in the snow. InHampton, N.H., search parties went out after the storms hunting for widows and elderly people at risk of freezing to death. It wasn't uncommon for them to lose their bearings and not be able to find the houses. Sometimes they were found burning their furniture because they couldn't get to the woodshed.

    Countless numbers of livestock perished in the storms, and many stories recounted farmers spending weeks digging out cows, sheep, chickens and pigs, often reporting that they had miraculously found animals alive under the snow and restored them to health. A couple of pigs worked their way out of a snowbank 27 days after the storm ended, having survived on some tansy. Hens lasted as long as a week under the snow, turkeys as long as 20 days.

    The deer population was reduced tremendously, some estimated 90 percent of it was lost. Some towns made clearings where the animals could seek shelter to avoid the wolves and other predators.

    Though life slowed to a crawl, it did not stop. The mails were delayed, but they were delivered by post boys who got around on snowshoe throughout New England, still using them late into March. People maintained tunnels and paths through the snow from house to house.

    Joshua Coffin’s history of Newbury, Mass. recounts the charming tale of Abraham Adams who managed to escape through a window of his house and walk three miles on snowshoe to visit Abigail, his new wife since December of 1716. The newlyweds were apparently separated by the storm and she was holed up with her family. He managed to enter their house via a second-story window.

    They had their first child, if you’re curious, on Nov. 25, 1717, almost nine months to the day after the great snow.

    If you enjoyed this story, you might want to sign up for free and stay up to date with all New England Historical Society articles. Click here to sign up now! This story was updated from the 2014 version.

    Last edited by ibleedgreen; 02-18-2015 at 04:44 PM.

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