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Thread: Now you will be really happy with the Harvin trade

  1. #1

    Now you will be really happy with the Harvin trade

    Scoggins: Harvin's nonstop drama wore thin with Vikings
    Article by: CHIP SCOGGINS , Star Tribune Updated: March 12, 2013 - 7:21 AM
    Harvin provided some thrilling moments and high-level production for four seasons. But he made life uncomfortable off the field and walked away from the team last season.

    Percy Harvin conducted his introductory news conference with the Vikings in April 2009. He was polite and charming that day, and more important, he seemed remorseful about a failed drug test that caused him to tumble down the draft board into the Vikings’ arms at No. 22.

    Harvin made a favorable first impression with his candor and humility. He looked into a wall of cameras and told everyone that he’s “not a phony person.” He didn’t sound like the same guy depicted as a malcontent and troublemaker at Florida.

    Not sure what to make of Harvin, I called a writer who covered him in college for an unvarnished opinion. He paused for a few seconds.

    “With Percy,” he said, “it’s always something.”


    Those words came rushing back Monday with news that the Vikings traded Harvin to Seattle for several draft picks, including a first-rounder (No. 25 overall) in the upcoming draft. This is one of those polarizing trades that shakes the NFL — a team ridding itself of an elite talent and popular player in the prime of his career.

    Some Vikings fans will love the move, some will hate it. But this outcome seemed inevitable the moment Harvin disappeared from Winter Park this season. As his teammates came together for a common purpose to make the playoffs, Harvin retreated to Florida, unhappy with something or someone.

    That was simply Harvin being Harvin. It’s always something with him, which is why the Vikings couldn’t risk giving him a top-dollar contract in line with the NFL’s best receivers. What if that didn’t make him happy, either?


    This stare-down was never about talent. Harvin is one of the most physically gifted and unique players in the league. He’s breathtaking with the ball in his hands, a combination of running back and wide receiver who is not afraid to take on linebackers in open field. He’s exceptional as a kickoff returner, too. And he gives nothing but maximum effort on the field, which endeared him to fans and gained him respect around the league. That kind of talent and production won’t be easy to replace.

    Some will blame the Vikings for not bending over backward to make the relationship work or for not tolerating a volatile player. Harvin is not the first player to act like a drama diva, of course. Maybe they could have done more, but we don’t know what happened or what was said in private conversations.

    One recent report suggested the Vikings feared Harvin might hold out as long as possible if they didn’t meet his contract demands. Whatever the reason(s), the organization obviously felt the relationship was damaged beyond repair and that they are better off without Harvin, despite everything that he provides on the field.

    In the end, Harvin just seemed like he didn’t want to be here anymore. He reportedly argued with Leslie Frazier, and there were rumors of his unhappiness over the team’s choice of quarterback. He didn’t even stick around as his team showed some life and fight in chasing a playoff berth.

    Harvin put the Vikings in a tough spot because he’s an elite player who wanted to be paid accordingly, but his wild mood swings and petulant behavior made it impossible to trust him. He once threw a weight at former coach Brad Childress during an argument and even sparred with a player-friendly and mild-mannered coach in Frazier.


    Harvin was a tough guy to read. He could be engaging and funny one day, grumpy and terse the next. The Vikings never really knew what to expect from him.

    Harvin stunned everyone — even coaches and teammates — when he showed up for voluntary workouts last spring, vowing to take a leadership role. He texted Frazier when he arrived in town, to which his coach replied, “Is this the real Percy Harvin?”

    Harvin requested a trade three weeks later and then pretended it didn’t happen 24 hours after that. Eventually, that act becomes tiresome and is detrimental to the culture that Frazier is trying to create.


    Naturally, this move weakens the Vikings on the field, but we’ll reserve ultimate judgment until we see the team’s countermoves in free agency and the draft. General Manager Rick Spielman recouped a nice haul in return, considering the circumstances.

    Harvin provided some thrilling moments and high-level production for four seasons. But he made life uncomfortable off the field and walked away from the team last season.

    A trade like this is difficult, but maybe it’s best for everyone involved.



    Chip Scoggins • ascoggins@startribune.com

  2. #2

    Cris Carter says the Vikings are ‘better off’

    Cris Carter says the Vikings are ‘better off’
    Article by: MARK CRAIG , Star Tribune Updated: March 12, 2013 - 12:18 AM
    The Vikings great thought the organization did the right thing in moving Percy Harvin, and he liked what the team got in return.

    One of the greatest receivers in Vikings history believes the team’s future is “better off” without Percy Harvin.

    “I think the organization did the right thing,” Hall of Famer Cris Carter said when asked about Monday’s trade that sent Harvin to Seattle for first- and seventh-round picks this year and a third-round pick in 2014.

    “I’m not surprised, given the situation with him not being happy and there being so little chance of a contract extension for the type of money he wants. So they’re better off, especially with a young quarterback, trading Percy and getting something for him compared to going through the season rolling the dice.”

    Carter also was impressed by what the Vikings got in return.

    “Chicago got an elite receiver in Brandon Marshall and it only cost them two third-round picks,” Carter said. “So I think the Vikings did well. And they’re able to keep their salary cap intact rather than paying $11 million to $13 million a year to a guy that you don’t know how much he’s going to play. With Percy’s style, he’s going to get hurt.

    “And don’t forget, the Vikings also had a lot of success without Percy at the end of last season.”


    Now, of course, comes the hard part: replenishing a position that already was thin before the trade.

    The Vikings have only two receivers under contract who have played an NFL game. Jarius Wright, a fourth-round pick last year, has 22 catches, while Stephen Burton, a seventh-round pick in 2011, has seven career catches. The only other receivers on the roster are practice squad player Chris Summers and 2012 fourth-round pick Greg Childs, who tore the patellar tendon in both knees last summer.

    Carter said he’d start by re-signing Jerome Simpson at a reasonable price. Then he’d look for a bargain on a second-tier veteran free agent.

    “You really can’t overextend for a receiver and pay $11 million a year, so I can understand them not being in the Mike Wallace sweepstakes,” Carter said. “As far as Greg Jennings, I would at least look at him and see what it would take to get him.”

    Two cheaper second-tier options: Indianapolis’ Donnie Avery, who had 60 catches last year, including nine for 111 yards in a victory over the Vikings; and St. Louis’ Brandon Gibson, who had 51 catches and five touchdowns a year ago.

    The Vikings also are better suited to dip into the pool of restricted free agents now that they’re armed with an extra first-round pick. The Giants’ Victor Cruz would cost a first-round pick and a lucrative offer, but the 26-year-old rising star could be worth it.

    Then there’s the draft, where the Vikings hope to benefit from a strong, deep class.

    “They’re going to have to draft at least three receivers, including one in the first round,” Carter said. “But they’re fortunate. In this year’s class, you can get a fourth-rounder who can help right away.”

    Carter likes Cal’s Keenan Allen, a projected first-rounder he’s been working with. Allen’s stock has been dropping because of concerns about his knee, but he can change that with a strong performance at his pro day next month.

    “I don’t see any receiver in the first round that’s better than him,” Carter said. “Keenan would be a good pick for the Vikings [at No. 23].”


    Tennessee’s Cordarelle Patterson probably will be off the board by No. 23. But there will be many other quality options available.

    “It just depends on what your flavor is,” Carter said. “Actually, one guy to watch is Tavon Austin from West Virginia. He’s a lot like Percy. You can get that Harvin-type playmaking and speed component back with Tavon. I think the Vikings should be able to get the player they need.”

  3. #3
    Robert Smith's comments were consistent with what Cris Carter said. And indeed, when you consider what the Fins got for Marshall, we did very well. And when I read the comments about Harvin in the first article, it's clear it was just going to be a matter of time before he blew up.

    We got very good value for a head case and we've replaced a questionable character (Harvin) with a high character (Jennings). Maybe Simpson returns to his 2011 form. And Wright builds on his strong finish in 2012.

    Now we don't have to draft a WR in the first round. In fact, I'm hoping we can trade down a bit into the 2nd, where guys like Allen, Williams, Hopkins, Hunter, and Woods will be available. We take a couple of them, and we're set.

    This is gonna be a fun draft for us!:lolflag::lolflag::lolflag:

  4. #4
    Upper Deck, On the Rail
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedMcCombs View Post
    Robert Smith's comments were consistent with what Cris Carter said. And indeed, when you consider what the Fins got for Marshall, we did very well. And when I read the comments about Harvin in the first article, it's clear it was just going to be a matter of time before he blew up.

    We got very good value for a head case and we've replaced a questionable character (Harvin) with a high character (Jennings). Maybe Simpson returns to his 2011 form. And Wright builds on his strong finish in 2012.

    Now we don't have to draft a WR in the first round. In fact, I'm hoping we can trade down a bit into the 2nd, where guys like Allen, Williams, Hopkins, Hunter, and Woods will be available. We take a couple of them, and we're set.

    This is gonna be a fun draft for us!:lolflag::lolflag::lolflag:
    Agree. I expect bigger things from Simpson and hopefully Jennings character rubs off on him a bit.

    Here is a question: Do we monitor Barkley in the draft and if he falls into the 2nd round grab him and tell Webb that he is a WR now?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jcholo View Post
    Agree. I expect bigger things from Simpson and hopefully Jennings character rubs off on him a bit.

    Here is a question: Do we monitor Barkley in the draft and if he falls into the 2nd round grab him and tell Webb that he is a WR now?
    With the signing of Cassel, Webb is either a WR or Safety...or he's gone.

    Barkely is a project just like Ponder. We can't afford to have two of them. I am sure they won't go after Barkley.

  6. #6
    Percy Harvin trade initially shot down by Seahawks GM54By Chris Wesseling
    Around the League Writer
    Published: March 19, 2013 at 06:27 p.m. Updated: March 19, 2013 at 10:44 p.m. Friend(s)

    The Seattle Seahawks were one of multiple teams to discuss a Percy Harvin trade with the Minnesota Vikings, but it wasn't Seahawks general manager John Schneider who initiated the talks.

    When Schneider first was approached about a Harvin trade, his answer was "absolutely no," according to SI.com's Peter King.

    With cornerback Richard Sherman and safeties Earl Thomas and Kam Chancellor next in line for lucrative contract extensions with the Seahawks, Schneider was hesitant to pay a receiver who reportedly was seeking an outlandish contract on par with Calvin Johnson or Larry Fitzgerald.

    Once Schneider dug deeper, though, he discovered Harvin might settle for Vincent Jackson money ($11 million annually) if it meant escaping what had devolved into a poisonous situation in Minnesota, originally stemming from a strained relationship with former Vikings coach Brad Childress.

    Similar to the New England Patriots' gambles on reputed malcontents such as Randy Moss and Corey Dillon, the Seahawks are counting on the change of scenery to a committed contender with a strong-willed quarterback as the panacea for Harvin's attitude problems.

    Because Schneider and former salary-cap specialist John Idzik managed the salary cap so well the past three years, the Seahawks could afford to be the only NFL team paying two wide receivers more than $8 million per season. It certainly helped that Harvin carried the "street cred" to command respect in the team's pay-day pecking order.

    Harvin was tied for the NFL lead with 62 receptions, first in the NFL with 531 yards after the catch, second in kickoff return average (35.9) and second in receiving yards (677) before the ankle injury that ended his season in Week 9.

    Schneider took a risk not just on one of the league's most dynamic players but also a versatile weapon in Harvin, whom NFL Films analyst Greg Cosell recently described as "a movable chess piece that advances the continuing evolution of NFL offense" once teamed with Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson.

  7. #7
    People wonder why a team would draft him in the first place with the attitude problems, but I think teams figure "he's young and he'll grow out of it". Sometimes that happens, sometimes it doesn't. Sometimes you can work around it, sometimes you can't. Randy Moss is a good example of never growing up, Terell Owens is another. Both obviously could play just fine but couldn't keep their mouths shut. But I don't think either of those two were selfish per se. Harvin seems to be very selfish. To him there is definitely an "I" in "team". Or maybe you can't spell "team" without "me" is more appropriate. :lolflag:.

    Anyway, he's somewhere else now, a problem for someone else. He seems happy in Seattle but how long that will last is anyone's guess. I'm betting we haven't seen the last of his ugly side.

  8. #8
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    Reading some of these articles almost has me thinking the guy has a personality disorder or something. Seems like everyone that was formerly close to him references frequently swinging moods, violent outbursts, and unpredictability.

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